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Beghrir (Moroccan Pancakes) recipe

Beghrir (Moroccan Pancakes) recipe


  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Pancakes

Moroccan pancakes served with honey-butter sauce. Best during Ramadan for breaking the fast or pre-dawn, but certainly great anytime.

38 people made this

IngredientsMakes: 12 pancakes

  • 250ml warm water (45 degrees C)
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried active baking yeast
  • 1/2 teaspoon caster sugar
  • 250ml milk
  • 125g plain flour
  • 160g semolina
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Sauce
  • 90g butter
  • 7 tablespoons honey
  • 1 teaspoon orange blossom water, or to taste (optional)

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:35min ›Extra time:30min resting › Ready in:1hr15min

  1. Place the water, yeast and sugar in a blender, and let stand without blending for 5 minutes, until the yeast softens and begins to form a creamy foam. Add the milk, flour, semolina, eggs, baking powder and salt. Blend until the mixture is smooth, about 1 minute. Leave the mixture in the blender to rest for about 30 minutes.
  2. Heat a 10cm nonstick frying pan over medium-low heat. Blend the pancake mixture for about 10 seconds, to remix, and scoop 4 to 5 tablespoons of batter into the heated pan. Cook the beghrir until bubbles have formed and popped, and the top of the pancake is no longer shiny, about 3 minutes. Do not flip. Adjust the heat as necessary so that the bottoms of the pancakes are just starting to brown when the tops are dry. Blend the batter for 10 seconds or so after cooking 3 or 4 pancakes, to keep the batter fluffy.
  3. To make the sauce, place the butter, honey and orange blossom water in a microwave-safe bowl, and microwave on High setting until the butter is melted and the honey is hot, about 1 1/2 minutes. Stir the sauce, and drizzle about 1 tablespoon over each warm pancake to serve.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(13)

Reviews in English (11)

by Nelleke

Wow! These are tasty, beautiful, and fun. I made these as written, except that I omitted the orange-flower water from the sauce (I didn't have it in the house). The only change I would make next time is to cut the salt just a tad. My 2-year-old loved watching the lacy pattern emerge (though he was not quite so enthusiastic about the taste as I was).-26 Feb 2011

by BristolCave

This recipe was great, I wanted something interesting for Christmas morning and this was it. Came out exactly like the picture and it makes a ton. The syrup was also very different, far from maple but better for it. I had no trouble finding seminola flour, it is pricey but was sitting right there in the baking aisle. Overall definitely a recipe to play with!-25 Dec 2010

by angelas

I could not find Semolina anywhere so I just used two cups of all-purpose flour. They turned out ok. not quite as "airy" as I have had before, but not bad. You have to adjust the temperature on the stove a lot considering that you don't flip these and you can really taste any dark/burnt spots. I have had a lot of Moroccan food and am very excited to be able to learn how to cook it myself. Thanks for the recipe!!!-13 Sep 2009


Baghrir Recipe (Moroccan Semolina Pancake)

Baghrir (or Beghrir) are small spongy pancakes popular in the Maghreb region common for breakfast, as a snack and for iftar during Ramadan. People make baghrir from semolina or flour. When beghrir is cooked correctly, it is riddled with many tiny holes that will soak up any sauce they you serve them with. The usual way to eat baghrir in Algeria and Morocco is dipping it in a honey-butter mix, or cut into wedges and served with jam. It is also common to add raisins to baghrir.


Baghrirs - Moroccan Pancakes Recipe

Beghrir is a type of pancake wich is smooth on one side and full of bubbles on the other. It is very light and melts in the mouth, SHOULD BE EATEN WITH SUGAR OR HONEY!

  • moroccan
  • middle
  • east
  • delicious
  • fry
  • moroccan

Schedule your weekly meals and get auto-generated shopping lists.

  • 1 cup of fine semolina
  • ½ Cup flour
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 2 cups warm water
  • 2 tsp. dry yeast
  • 2 tsp. sugar

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of fine semolinashopping list
  • ½ Cup flourshopping list
  • 1 tsp. saltshopping list
  • 2 tsp. baking powdershopping list
  • 2 cups warm watershopping list
  • 2 tsp. dry yeastshopping list
  • 2 tsp. sugarshopping list

How to make it

  • In a bowl, mix semolina, flour, salt and baking powder.
  • Mix it with with warm water and yeast diluted in warm water and sugar. Preserve the mix and let it rise 1 hour. Just before cooking stir with ladle.
  • Pour a small quantity into a hot smooth pan. Cook Baghir on one side only.
  • Serve hot with a mixture of honey and melted butter or Olive oil or Jam.

The yeast in the batter makes the batter to bubble while cooking. This is how it gets all the holes, and therefore this amazing spongy texture. Beghrir is always cooked on one side. It only take a few minutes, when you see that the batter is not wet any more on the top you know your Moroccan pancake is ready.

An important part of the cooking process is not to swirl the pan around like you would do with a crepe. Rather pour in the batter and just leave it. You can decide on your preferred size. Such as multiple small Beghrir in saucer sizes, or either one or two large.

If your pancake does not 'bubble' it is most likely that the batter is too thick. You can try to add 1 or 2 tablespoons of water to your batter, and leave it to rest for 10 more minutes. It might also be that you have rested the batter too long, and that the yeast has already bubbled too much while resting the batter. It might take some trials before you learn the right consistency and resting time. Not every yeast works the same.

Beghrir keep well if they are wrapped in plastic and left at room temperature. So enjoy them as an afternoon snack or either keep them for your next day breakfast.

For more Moroccan bread recipes, check out

Beghrir is part of 'Travels of taste'. Using our taste buds to travel the world and discover the use of our senses and imaginations to meet other cultures through food. Imagine the hustle & bustle of the souks, and get a taste of the amazing flavours Morocco has to offer. Check out my full Moroccan 'travels of taste' post >>> Morocco - the flavours of the souks

Try these delicious Moroccan pancakes, and add @haricoco1 to your instagram post, I love to see your Beghrir creations.


Baghrir - Moroccan Semolina Pancakes

Tender, spongy, and chewy, these traditional Moroccan Pancakes (Baghrir) are worth trying for their look alone. Their surface is decorated with hundreds of small holes! Served with a honey and butter mixture, these pancakes are also heavenly delicious!

I am continuing my journey through the exotic and unique Moroccan cuisine. I already made the famous Harira soup and the classic Moroccan bread. So far so good! I enjoyed the hell out of both of these dishes! This time I will get you acquainted with the traditional Moroccan pancakes made from semolina and called Baghrir (or sometimes Beghrir). These tender and spongy guys are eaten during breakfast or as a snack. They are not your ordinary pancakes both in terms of taste and appearance. In fact, their look alone is so awesome that I wanted to make them just because of it!

So, what's so unique about the appearance of these pancakes? The holes. Dozens or hundreds of small holes decorating the surface of Baghrir. That's the reason why it is also known as "thousand holes pancake". These little craters form as soon as the batter hits the pan. It happens because of the yeast. Just remember that your batter has to be quite thin. If it will be too thick, the famous holes won't appear! The pancake will still be edible but let's be frank: we want those little pretty holes! Otherwise, Baghrir will lose all the charm.

Moroccan pancakes are traditionally served with honey and butter mixture (sometimes with jam). What a great topping it is! I loved it from the very moment I licked it from my fingers. This mixture goes so well with Baghrir. Honey and Baghrir are meant to be together because the pancakes look like a honeycomb, ha! The holes perfectly absorb all the liquid making the pancakes moist and melt-in-your-mouth good.

It was the first time I made pancakes with semolina and I enjoyed them very much. They are fluffy, chewy and so heavenly delicious with that honey and butter topping! I highly recommend you to try these ones. They are unique. They really are.


Related Video

I'm sorry, this didn't turn out so great. I love the idea of the holey tops but couldn't get passed texture. I only made 2 just to try, then made the rest as crepes to use up the batter because I don't want it to go to waste. I'm sure there's potential in this recipe with minor tweaks.

I was so excited to try this. I ate these in a B&B in Morocco 3 years ago and have been "craving" them since. Although the spongy texture was right with all the little bubbles, the taste was not-so-great. If I make it again, I will add more sugar to the batter and see if that helps at all. All the same, thank you for sharing this exotic wisdom!

I was so excited to try this. I ate these in a B&B in Morocco 3 years ago and have been "craving" them since. Although the spongy texture was right with all the little bubbles, the taste was not-so-great. If I make it again, I will add more sugar to the batter and see if that helps at all. All the same, thank you for sharing this exotic wisdom!


Baghrir Recipe – Sweet Moroccan Pancake

For this Sunday, I am bringing you one of the classic of all classics, it’s called Baghrir. It’s a Moroccan pancake that I grew up eating on weekends and holidays and boy did I love it!

Today you will get to love it too. And the best part is, this pancake is vegan friendly.

Mille Trous

Known as Baghrir in Morocco and Mille trous in France which literally translates to thousand holes, this pancake is a keeper. I was introduced to it at a very young age thanks to my mom and instantly fell in love with it.

I loved the sweet and buttery taste of it, and what I love the most was the fact that this pancake even served cold, still had a heartwarming effect on me.

It’s totally true, you can make them ahead, let them completely cool, store them somewhere safe and a day later all you got to do is warm up some honey and butter and put on top. It’s like they were just made.

Lea’s favorite breakfast food

I don’t know of any breakfast recipe that Lea likes better than this, I don’t think she does either. From the moment she tasted these pancakes, she has been pestering me, I am choosing my words carefully here, to make here the pancakes each Sunday.

Luckily, this pancake recipe is extremely easy and does not require much effort. It’s all done in a blender. So, I don’t mind making this, and even teaching it to Lea.

I’m lucky to have a woman who is pleased with simple things.

The result

In three words again, I will sum this up for you:

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Beghrir - Moroccan Pancakes

800ml luke warm water - has to be luke warm to activate the yeast.

2 teaspoon of baking powder

Method

Mix all ingredients until the batter is smooth. Cover the batter in cling wrap, place in a warm water bath and leave for 30 minutes.

Beghrir is cooked only on one side. They're easy to make, but in order for the bubbles to form properly, the batter must be the right consistency. If the batter is too thick, the bubbles can't form.

Stir the batter, and use a ladle to pour batter into the cold crepe pan. Make the beghrir as large as you like.

Bubbles should appear on the surface of the beghrir as it cooks. Cook for about two to three minutes, or until the beghrir doesn't appear wet anywhere on the surface.

Transfer the beghrir to cool in a single layer on a clean kitchen towel. Once they are cool, they can be stacked without sticking.

Serve either with a butter/honey syrup or preferably with Amlou and/or ice cream.

This recipe was featured on Foodie Tuesday, a weekly segment with Raf Epstein on Drive, 774 ABC Melbourne, 3:30 PM.


Moroccan Meloui Recipe – Round Laminated Moroccan Pancakes or Crepes

Moroccan meloui or malawi (plural) takes its name from the Moroccan Arabic word for &ldquorolled.&rdquo This is an apt description since indeed these laminated Moroccan pancakes&mdashor &ldquocrepes&rdquo as &hellip


Beghrir: Moroccan Pancakes

Extremely spongy and melts in your mouth, and there is a high chance you mistook this as “Appam” if you are hailing from Kerala, southern India, or have tried Kerala cuisine.

I like the pronunciation of Beghrir. It’s a bit tricky as BAR(French R) =REER (English R). The letters “gh” in the word “Ba gh rir” together are pronounced like the French “R,” similar to a gurgling sound in the back of the throat, like in the French word “Rivière.”

I accidentally came across this dish, not sure how. But it caught my attention simply by the look of it and its simplicity. It’s made from mixing fine semolina and All-purpose flour. Beghrir’s can be served as breakfast or dinner if you prefer in fact, I made these for dinner the other day.

I never thought semolina is a common product, especially outside India, but I have to say I came across a wide variety of semolina dishes.

Beghrir is known as Moroccan pancakes, normally cooked only on one side. Though it’s easy to make, the batter should be the right consistency, a crepe-like batter, in order for the bubbles to form properly.

There is no definite yield from these measurements. These pancakes can be made small or big, up to your likeness. However, from the given measurements, I made 8 medium-sized pancakes, as shown in the picture.


Watch the video: Easiest Moroccan Pancakes, Beghrir اسهل بغرير. Professional Pastry Chef Makes