New recipes

Queen's Corgi Definitely Doesn't Like Marmite

Queen's Corgi Definitely Doesn't Like Marmite


Well, a corgi playing the queen's corgi doesn't like Marmite

It seems everyone is celebrating the Queen's Jubilee; in honor of the event, the yeasty spread Marmite released Ma'amite, tagging it more properly, "One either loves it, or one hates it."

Marmite, first developed in Britain, is a dark brown, sticky, savory spread often spread on toast. The original tagline, "Love it or hate it," refers to its devoted fan club and equally devoted haters. In the corresponding advertisement, you see an adorable corgi trying it out, and obviously hating it. Sure, it doesn't put the product in the best light, but it's hilarious.

In all the pomp and circumstance of the celebration of the queen's 60-year-reign, this ad is fairly cavalier and a breath of fresh air. Let's just hope there isn't a Ma'amite shortage anytime soon, lest the Brits get their own Marmageddon.

Also, in similar queen/corgi news, here's a look at the queen and her corgis throughout the years, courtesy of Buzzfeed.


Here’s Everything The Kings and Queens of England Ate Throughout History

When we think about the royal family, we often imagine a life of decadence and splendor. We watch their fashion choices closely, we try to guess the names of their future children, and we go absolutely manic when they get married. But what about their food choices? Do royal family meals consist of eating caviar and sipping on expensive wines every day, or do the royals make hunger-inspired McDonald’s runs like the rest of us?

We already know that Meghan Markle has a deep passion for food (she even co-wrote a cookbook) and that the royal kiddos have to follow a few specific and sort of quirky food rules — but what’s on the day-to-day menu? And what about royal banquets? Can they indulge in a pint (ice cream or beer — you decide) after a long day? Do they order in some nice take-out or enjoy fish n’ chips? (Actually, yes. William and Kate love to order curry while binge-watching HBO). And what about England’s kings and queens of the past? Is it all turkey legs and mead? The answer is, basically, yes.

Let’s take a look at what England’s royal family ate throughout history, starting with a look at the royal family’s preferences today.

The queen has to be pretty health conscious.

Queen Elizabeth II has always been in good health. This may be due in part to the fact that she follows a rather smart diet. She keeps away from low-nutrient, starchy foods like pasta, potatoes, and bread (especially for meals like lunch). And if the queen does eat pasta, it’s freshly made —and definitely not out of a box. She instead focuses on cleaner eats like grilled fish and freshly picked strawberries — you know, from her own estate in Balmoral, Scotland. The catch: She will only eat seasonal fruits, so if it wasn’t born of the earth on its own, she’s not interested.

So, what will you never find in the royal family’s meals? Garlic and shellfish — both are forbidden.

Why, you ask? Well, shellfish could get any of the royals sick without warning, and the queen thinks garlic is straight-up gross. And if she doesn’t like it, it definitely won’t be found in any royal dishes.

The queen enjoys a nice Sunday roast.

Just like any other family, the queen and her kin like to chow down at a nice Sunday roast, and – according to her former chef – the queen, prefers her meat well done. Oh, and she likes her mushrooms cooked with a dash of Marmite. Marmite, for those who aren’t familiar, is certainly an acquired taste.

The queen is not a foodie, nor a big lover of food.

In fact, one former chef explains, “Sadly, the Queen is not a foodie. She eats to live, unlike Prince Philip who loves to eat and would stand and talk food all day,” as noted in the Telegraph.

The queen loves a stiff drink.

Many pieces have been written about the queen’s love for a good drink. While perhaps it’s become a bit exaggerated, it’s likely that she enjoys a drink just about as often as the rest of us. After all, she is the leader of a country with a lot on her mind, so she deserves her share of gin and Dubonnet cocktails (with a lemon slice and some ice, just like the Queen Mother did).

Reportedly, she also enjoys a bit of wine and champagne throughout her day.

Even the royal corgis eat well.

One former chef recalls making an elaborate, delicious dish: “I simmered rabbit, cooked down some chicken, then finely chopped the meat, sieved the stock, and returned the meat… It was the corgis’ dog food.” In fact, the royal corgis are universally adored and have long been a part of the royal family makeup. Apparently, the queen has owned over 30 corgis since her coronation in 1952. The royal corgis even have their own Wikipedia page.

Prince Charles is a big fan of organic and foraged foods.

It’s known that the Prince of Wales and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, are fans of organic and sustainable eats — and good on them for promoting it! In fact, Prince Charles been called “one of the forerunners of the organic movement,” according to Today. Prince Charles owns an organic farm — one of the very first certified organic English farms — at Highgrove House, his private residence.

Prince Charles even grows fruits and veggies, and has his menus planned around foods that can be foraged — like wild mushrooms.

Yum! We wonder if he likes Marmite on his mushrooms, too?


Here’s Everything The Kings and Queens of England Ate Throughout History

When we think about the royal family, we often imagine a life of decadence and splendor. We watch their fashion choices closely, we try to guess the names of their future children, and we go absolutely manic when they get married. But what about their food choices? Do royal family meals consist of eating caviar and sipping on expensive wines every day, or do the royals make hunger-inspired McDonald’s runs like the rest of us?

We already know that Meghan Markle has a deep passion for food (she even co-wrote a cookbook) and that the royal kiddos have to follow a few specific and sort of quirky food rules — but what’s on the day-to-day menu? And what about royal banquets? Can they indulge in a pint (ice cream or beer — you decide) after a long day? Do they order in some nice take-out or enjoy fish n’ chips? (Actually, yes. William and Kate love to order curry while binge-watching HBO). And what about England’s kings and queens of the past? Is it all turkey legs and mead? The answer is, basically, yes.

Let’s take a look at what England’s royal family ate throughout history, starting with a look at the royal family’s preferences today.

The queen has to be pretty health conscious.

Queen Elizabeth II has always been in good health. This may be due in part to the fact that she follows a rather smart diet. She keeps away from low-nutrient, starchy foods like pasta, potatoes, and bread (especially for meals like lunch). And if the queen does eat pasta, it’s freshly made —and definitely not out of a box. She instead focuses on cleaner eats like grilled fish and freshly picked strawberries — you know, from her own estate in Balmoral, Scotland. The catch: She will only eat seasonal fruits, so if it wasn’t born of the earth on its own, she’s not interested.

So, what will you never find in the royal family’s meals? Garlic and shellfish — both are forbidden.

Why, you ask? Well, shellfish could get any of the royals sick without warning, and the queen thinks garlic is straight-up gross. And if she doesn’t like it, it definitely won’t be found in any royal dishes.

The queen enjoys a nice Sunday roast.

Just like any other family, the queen and her kin like to chow down at a nice Sunday roast, and – according to her former chef – the queen, prefers her meat well done. Oh, and she likes her mushrooms cooked with a dash of Marmite. Marmite, for those who aren’t familiar, is certainly an acquired taste.

The queen is not a foodie, nor a big lover of food.

In fact, one former chef explains, “Sadly, the Queen is not a foodie. She eats to live, unlike Prince Philip who loves to eat and would stand and talk food all day,” as noted in the Telegraph.

The queen loves a stiff drink.

Many pieces have been written about the queen’s love for a good drink. While perhaps it’s become a bit exaggerated, it’s likely that she enjoys a drink just about as often as the rest of us. After all, she is the leader of a country with a lot on her mind, so she deserves her share of gin and Dubonnet cocktails (with a lemon slice and some ice, just like the Queen Mother did).

Reportedly, she also enjoys a bit of wine and champagne throughout her day.

Even the royal corgis eat well.

One former chef recalls making an elaborate, delicious dish: “I simmered rabbit, cooked down some chicken, then finely chopped the meat, sieved the stock, and returned the meat… It was the corgis’ dog food.” In fact, the royal corgis are universally adored and have long been a part of the royal family makeup. Apparently, the queen has owned over 30 corgis since her coronation in 1952. The royal corgis even have their own Wikipedia page.

Prince Charles is a big fan of organic and foraged foods.

It’s known that the Prince of Wales and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, are fans of organic and sustainable eats — and good on them for promoting it! In fact, Prince Charles been called “one of the forerunners of the organic movement,” according to Today. Prince Charles owns an organic farm — one of the very first certified organic English farms — at Highgrove House, his private residence.

Prince Charles even grows fruits and veggies, and has his menus planned around foods that can be foraged — like wild mushrooms.

Yum! We wonder if he likes Marmite on his mushrooms, too?


Here’s Everything The Kings and Queens of England Ate Throughout History

When we think about the royal family, we often imagine a life of decadence and splendor. We watch their fashion choices closely, we try to guess the names of their future children, and we go absolutely manic when they get married. But what about their food choices? Do royal family meals consist of eating caviar and sipping on expensive wines every day, or do the royals make hunger-inspired McDonald’s runs like the rest of us?

We already know that Meghan Markle has a deep passion for food (she even co-wrote a cookbook) and that the royal kiddos have to follow a few specific and sort of quirky food rules — but what’s on the day-to-day menu? And what about royal banquets? Can they indulge in a pint (ice cream or beer — you decide) after a long day? Do they order in some nice take-out or enjoy fish n’ chips? (Actually, yes. William and Kate love to order curry while binge-watching HBO). And what about England’s kings and queens of the past? Is it all turkey legs and mead? The answer is, basically, yes.

Let’s take a look at what England’s royal family ate throughout history, starting with a look at the royal family’s preferences today.

The queen has to be pretty health conscious.

Queen Elizabeth II has always been in good health. This may be due in part to the fact that she follows a rather smart diet. She keeps away from low-nutrient, starchy foods like pasta, potatoes, and bread (especially for meals like lunch). And if the queen does eat pasta, it’s freshly made —and definitely not out of a box. She instead focuses on cleaner eats like grilled fish and freshly picked strawberries — you know, from her own estate in Balmoral, Scotland. The catch: She will only eat seasonal fruits, so if it wasn’t born of the earth on its own, she’s not interested.

So, what will you never find in the royal family’s meals? Garlic and shellfish — both are forbidden.

Why, you ask? Well, shellfish could get any of the royals sick without warning, and the queen thinks garlic is straight-up gross. And if she doesn’t like it, it definitely won’t be found in any royal dishes.

The queen enjoys a nice Sunday roast.

Just like any other family, the queen and her kin like to chow down at a nice Sunday roast, and – according to her former chef – the queen, prefers her meat well done. Oh, and she likes her mushrooms cooked with a dash of Marmite. Marmite, for those who aren’t familiar, is certainly an acquired taste.

The queen is not a foodie, nor a big lover of food.

In fact, one former chef explains, “Sadly, the Queen is not a foodie. She eats to live, unlike Prince Philip who loves to eat and would stand and talk food all day,” as noted in the Telegraph.

The queen loves a stiff drink.

Many pieces have been written about the queen’s love for a good drink. While perhaps it’s become a bit exaggerated, it’s likely that she enjoys a drink just about as often as the rest of us. After all, she is the leader of a country with a lot on her mind, so she deserves her share of gin and Dubonnet cocktails (with a lemon slice and some ice, just like the Queen Mother did).

Reportedly, she also enjoys a bit of wine and champagne throughout her day.

Even the royal corgis eat well.

One former chef recalls making an elaborate, delicious dish: “I simmered rabbit, cooked down some chicken, then finely chopped the meat, sieved the stock, and returned the meat… It was the corgis’ dog food.” In fact, the royal corgis are universally adored and have long been a part of the royal family makeup. Apparently, the queen has owned over 30 corgis since her coronation in 1952. The royal corgis even have their own Wikipedia page.

Prince Charles is a big fan of organic and foraged foods.

It’s known that the Prince of Wales and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, are fans of organic and sustainable eats — and good on them for promoting it! In fact, Prince Charles been called “one of the forerunners of the organic movement,” according to Today. Prince Charles owns an organic farm — one of the very first certified organic English farms — at Highgrove House, his private residence.

Prince Charles even grows fruits and veggies, and has his menus planned around foods that can be foraged — like wild mushrooms.

Yum! We wonder if he likes Marmite on his mushrooms, too?


Here’s Everything The Kings and Queens of England Ate Throughout History

When we think about the royal family, we often imagine a life of decadence and splendor. We watch their fashion choices closely, we try to guess the names of their future children, and we go absolutely manic when they get married. But what about their food choices? Do royal family meals consist of eating caviar and sipping on expensive wines every day, or do the royals make hunger-inspired McDonald’s runs like the rest of us?

We already know that Meghan Markle has a deep passion for food (she even co-wrote a cookbook) and that the royal kiddos have to follow a few specific and sort of quirky food rules — but what’s on the day-to-day menu? And what about royal banquets? Can they indulge in a pint (ice cream or beer — you decide) after a long day? Do they order in some nice take-out or enjoy fish n’ chips? (Actually, yes. William and Kate love to order curry while binge-watching HBO). And what about England’s kings and queens of the past? Is it all turkey legs and mead? The answer is, basically, yes.

Let’s take a look at what England’s royal family ate throughout history, starting with a look at the royal family’s preferences today.

The queen has to be pretty health conscious.

Queen Elizabeth II has always been in good health. This may be due in part to the fact that she follows a rather smart diet. She keeps away from low-nutrient, starchy foods like pasta, potatoes, and bread (especially for meals like lunch). And if the queen does eat pasta, it’s freshly made —and definitely not out of a box. She instead focuses on cleaner eats like grilled fish and freshly picked strawberries — you know, from her own estate in Balmoral, Scotland. The catch: She will only eat seasonal fruits, so if it wasn’t born of the earth on its own, she’s not interested.

So, what will you never find in the royal family’s meals? Garlic and shellfish — both are forbidden.

Why, you ask? Well, shellfish could get any of the royals sick without warning, and the queen thinks garlic is straight-up gross. And if she doesn’t like it, it definitely won’t be found in any royal dishes.

The queen enjoys a nice Sunday roast.

Just like any other family, the queen and her kin like to chow down at a nice Sunday roast, and – according to her former chef – the queen, prefers her meat well done. Oh, and she likes her mushrooms cooked with a dash of Marmite. Marmite, for those who aren’t familiar, is certainly an acquired taste.

The queen is not a foodie, nor a big lover of food.

In fact, one former chef explains, “Sadly, the Queen is not a foodie. She eats to live, unlike Prince Philip who loves to eat and would stand and talk food all day,” as noted in the Telegraph.

The queen loves a stiff drink.

Many pieces have been written about the queen’s love for a good drink. While perhaps it’s become a bit exaggerated, it’s likely that she enjoys a drink just about as often as the rest of us. After all, she is the leader of a country with a lot on her mind, so she deserves her share of gin and Dubonnet cocktails (with a lemon slice and some ice, just like the Queen Mother did).

Reportedly, she also enjoys a bit of wine and champagne throughout her day.

Even the royal corgis eat well.

One former chef recalls making an elaborate, delicious dish: “I simmered rabbit, cooked down some chicken, then finely chopped the meat, sieved the stock, and returned the meat… It was the corgis’ dog food.” In fact, the royal corgis are universally adored and have long been a part of the royal family makeup. Apparently, the queen has owned over 30 corgis since her coronation in 1952. The royal corgis even have their own Wikipedia page.

Prince Charles is a big fan of organic and foraged foods.

It’s known that the Prince of Wales and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, are fans of organic and sustainable eats — and good on them for promoting it! In fact, Prince Charles been called “one of the forerunners of the organic movement,” according to Today. Prince Charles owns an organic farm — one of the very first certified organic English farms — at Highgrove House, his private residence.

Prince Charles even grows fruits and veggies, and has his menus planned around foods that can be foraged — like wild mushrooms.

Yum! We wonder if he likes Marmite on his mushrooms, too?


Here’s Everything The Kings and Queens of England Ate Throughout History

When we think about the royal family, we often imagine a life of decadence and splendor. We watch their fashion choices closely, we try to guess the names of their future children, and we go absolutely manic when they get married. But what about their food choices? Do royal family meals consist of eating caviar and sipping on expensive wines every day, or do the royals make hunger-inspired McDonald’s runs like the rest of us?

We already know that Meghan Markle has a deep passion for food (she even co-wrote a cookbook) and that the royal kiddos have to follow a few specific and sort of quirky food rules — but what’s on the day-to-day menu? And what about royal banquets? Can they indulge in a pint (ice cream or beer — you decide) after a long day? Do they order in some nice take-out or enjoy fish n’ chips? (Actually, yes. William and Kate love to order curry while binge-watching HBO). And what about England’s kings and queens of the past? Is it all turkey legs and mead? The answer is, basically, yes.

Let’s take a look at what England’s royal family ate throughout history, starting with a look at the royal family’s preferences today.

The queen has to be pretty health conscious.

Queen Elizabeth II has always been in good health. This may be due in part to the fact that she follows a rather smart diet. She keeps away from low-nutrient, starchy foods like pasta, potatoes, and bread (especially for meals like lunch). And if the queen does eat pasta, it’s freshly made —and definitely not out of a box. She instead focuses on cleaner eats like grilled fish and freshly picked strawberries — you know, from her own estate in Balmoral, Scotland. The catch: She will only eat seasonal fruits, so if it wasn’t born of the earth on its own, she’s not interested.

So, what will you never find in the royal family’s meals? Garlic and shellfish — both are forbidden.

Why, you ask? Well, shellfish could get any of the royals sick without warning, and the queen thinks garlic is straight-up gross. And if she doesn’t like it, it definitely won’t be found in any royal dishes.

The queen enjoys a nice Sunday roast.

Just like any other family, the queen and her kin like to chow down at a nice Sunday roast, and – according to her former chef – the queen, prefers her meat well done. Oh, and she likes her mushrooms cooked with a dash of Marmite. Marmite, for those who aren’t familiar, is certainly an acquired taste.

The queen is not a foodie, nor a big lover of food.

In fact, one former chef explains, “Sadly, the Queen is not a foodie. She eats to live, unlike Prince Philip who loves to eat and would stand and talk food all day,” as noted in the Telegraph.

The queen loves a stiff drink.

Many pieces have been written about the queen’s love for a good drink. While perhaps it’s become a bit exaggerated, it’s likely that she enjoys a drink just about as often as the rest of us. After all, she is the leader of a country with a lot on her mind, so she deserves her share of gin and Dubonnet cocktails (with a lemon slice and some ice, just like the Queen Mother did).

Reportedly, she also enjoys a bit of wine and champagne throughout her day.

Even the royal corgis eat well.

One former chef recalls making an elaborate, delicious dish: “I simmered rabbit, cooked down some chicken, then finely chopped the meat, sieved the stock, and returned the meat… It was the corgis’ dog food.” In fact, the royal corgis are universally adored and have long been a part of the royal family makeup. Apparently, the queen has owned over 30 corgis since her coronation in 1952. The royal corgis even have their own Wikipedia page.

Prince Charles is a big fan of organic and foraged foods.

It’s known that the Prince of Wales and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, are fans of organic and sustainable eats — and good on them for promoting it! In fact, Prince Charles been called “one of the forerunners of the organic movement,” according to Today. Prince Charles owns an organic farm — one of the very first certified organic English farms — at Highgrove House, his private residence.

Prince Charles even grows fruits and veggies, and has his menus planned around foods that can be foraged — like wild mushrooms.

Yum! We wonder if he likes Marmite on his mushrooms, too?


Here’s Everything The Kings and Queens of England Ate Throughout History

When we think about the royal family, we often imagine a life of decadence and splendor. We watch their fashion choices closely, we try to guess the names of their future children, and we go absolutely manic when they get married. But what about their food choices? Do royal family meals consist of eating caviar and sipping on expensive wines every day, or do the royals make hunger-inspired McDonald’s runs like the rest of us?

We already know that Meghan Markle has a deep passion for food (she even co-wrote a cookbook) and that the royal kiddos have to follow a few specific and sort of quirky food rules — but what’s on the day-to-day menu? And what about royal banquets? Can they indulge in a pint (ice cream or beer — you decide) after a long day? Do they order in some nice take-out or enjoy fish n’ chips? (Actually, yes. William and Kate love to order curry while binge-watching HBO). And what about England’s kings and queens of the past? Is it all turkey legs and mead? The answer is, basically, yes.

Let’s take a look at what England’s royal family ate throughout history, starting with a look at the royal family’s preferences today.

The queen has to be pretty health conscious.

Queen Elizabeth II has always been in good health. This may be due in part to the fact that she follows a rather smart diet. She keeps away from low-nutrient, starchy foods like pasta, potatoes, and bread (especially for meals like lunch). And if the queen does eat pasta, it’s freshly made —and definitely not out of a box. She instead focuses on cleaner eats like grilled fish and freshly picked strawberries — you know, from her own estate in Balmoral, Scotland. The catch: She will only eat seasonal fruits, so if it wasn’t born of the earth on its own, she’s not interested.

So, what will you never find in the royal family’s meals? Garlic and shellfish — both are forbidden.

Why, you ask? Well, shellfish could get any of the royals sick without warning, and the queen thinks garlic is straight-up gross. And if she doesn’t like it, it definitely won’t be found in any royal dishes.

The queen enjoys a nice Sunday roast.

Just like any other family, the queen and her kin like to chow down at a nice Sunday roast, and – according to her former chef – the queen, prefers her meat well done. Oh, and she likes her mushrooms cooked with a dash of Marmite. Marmite, for those who aren’t familiar, is certainly an acquired taste.

The queen is not a foodie, nor a big lover of food.

In fact, one former chef explains, “Sadly, the Queen is not a foodie. She eats to live, unlike Prince Philip who loves to eat and would stand and talk food all day,” as noted in the Telegraph.

The queen loves a stiff drink.

Many pieces have been written about the queen’s love for a good drink. While perhaps it’s become a bit exaggerated, it’s likely that she enjoys a drink just about as often as the rest of us. After all, she is the leader of a country with a lot on her mind, so she deserves her share of gin and Dubonnet cocktails (with a lemon slice and some ice, just like the Queen Mother did).

Reportedly, she also enjoys a bit of wine and champagne throughout her day.

Even the royal corgis eat well.

One former chef recalls making an elaborate, delicious dish: “I simmered rabbit, cooked down some chicken, then finely chopped the meat, sieved the stock, and returned the meat… It was the corgis’ dog food.” In fact, the royal corgis are universally adored and have long been a part of the royal family makeup. Apparently, the queen has owned over 30 corgis since her coronation in 1952. The royal corgis even have their own Wikipedia page.

Prince Charles is a big fan of organic and foraged foods.

It’s known that the Prince of Wales and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, are fans of organic and sustainable eats — and good on them for promoting it! In fact, Prince Charles been called “one of the forerunners of the organic movement,” according to Today. Prince Charles owns an organic farm — one of the very first certified organic English farms — at Highgrove House, his private residence.

Prince Charles even grows fruits and veggies, and has his menus planned around foods that can be foraged — like wild mushrooms.

Yum! We wonder if he likes Marmite on his mushrooms, too?


Here’s Everything The Kings and Queens of England Ate Throughout History

When we think about the royal family, we often imagine a life of decadence and splendor. We watch their fashion choices closely, we try to guess the names of their future children, and we go absolutely manic when they get married. But what about their food choices? Do royal family meals consist of eating caviar and sipping on expensive wines every day, or do the royals make hunger-inspired McDonald’s runs like the rest of us?

We already know that Meghan Markle has a deep passion for food (she even co-wrote a cookbook) and that the royal kiddos have to follow a few specific and sort of quirky food rules — but what’s on the day-to-day menu? And what about royal banquets? Can they indulge in a pint (ice cream or beer — you decide) after a long day? Do they order in some nice take-out or enjoy fish n’ chips? (Actually, yes. William and Kate love to order curry while binge-watching HBO). And what about England’s kings and queens of the past? Is it all turkey legs and mead? The answer is, basically, yes.

Let’s take a look at what England’s royal family ate throughout history, starting with a look at the royal family’s preferences today.

The queen has to be pretty health conscious.

Queen Elizabeth II has always been in good health. This may be due in part to the fact that she follows a rather smart diet. She keeps away from low-nutrient, starchy foods like pasta, potatoes, and bread (especially for meals like lunch). And if the queen does eat pasta, it’s freshly made —and definitely not out of a box. She instead focuses on cleaner eats like grilled fish and freshly picked strawberries — you know, from her own estate in Balmoral, Scotland. The catch: She will only eat seasonal fruits, so if it wasn’t born of the earth on its own, she’s not interested.

So, what will you never find in the royal family’s meals? Garlic and shellfish — both are forbidden.

Why, you ask? Well, shellfish could get any of the royals sick without warning, and the queen thinks garlic is straight-up gross. And if she doesn’t like it, it definitely won’t be found in any royal dishes.

The queen enjoys a nice Sunday roast.

Just like any other family, the queen and her kin like to chow down at a nice Sunday roast, and – according to her former chef – the queen, prefers her meat well done. Oh, and she likes her mushrooms cooked with a dash of Marmite. Marmite, for those who aren’t familiar, is certainly an acquired taste.

The queen is not a foodie, nor a big lover of food.

In fact, one former chef explains, “Sadly, the Queen is not a foodie. She eats to live, unlike Prince Philip who loves to eat and would stand and talk food all day,” as noted in the Telegraph.

The queen loves a stiff drink.

Many pieces have been written about the queen’s love for a good drink. While perhaps it’s become a bit exaggerated, it’s likely that she enjoys a drink just about as often as the rest of us. After all, she is the leader of a country with a lot on her mind, so she deserves her share of gin and Dubonnet cocktails (with a lemon slice and some ice, just like the Queen Mother did).

Reportedly, she also enjoys a bit of wine and champagne throughout her day.

Even the royal corgis eat well.

One former chef recalls making an elaborate, delicious dish: “I simmered rabbit, cooked down some chicken, then finely chopped the meat, sieved the stock, and returned the meat… It was the corgis’ dog food.” In fact, the royal corgis are universally adored and have long been a part of the royal family makeup. Apparently, the queen has owned over 30 corgis since her coronation in 1952. The royal corgis even have their own Wikipedia page.

Prince Charles is a big fan of organic and foraged foods.

It’s known that the Prince of Wales and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, are fans of organic and sustainable eats — and good on them for promoting it! In fact, Prince Charles been called “one of the forerunners of the organic movement,” according to Today. Prince Charles owns an organic farm — one of the very first certified organic English farms — at Highgrove House, his private residence.

Prince Charles even grows fruits and veggies, and has his menus planned around foods that can be foraged — like wild mushrooms.

Yum! We wonder if he likes Marmite on his mushrooms, too?


Here’s Everything The Kings and Queens of England Ate Throughout History

When we think about the royal family, we often imagine a life of decadence and splendor. We watch their fashion choices closely, we try to guess the names of their future children, and we go absolutely manic when they get married. But what about their food choices? Do royal family meals consist of eating caviar and sipping on expensive wines every day, or do the royals make hunger-inspired McDonald’s runs like the rest of us?

We already know that Meghan Markle has a deep passion for food (she even co-wrote a cookbook) and that the royal kiddos have to follow a few specific and sort of quirky food rules — but what’s on the day-to-day menu? And what about royal banquets? Can they indulge in a pint (ice cream or beer — you decide) after a long day? Do they order in some nice take-out or enjoy fish n’ chips? (Actually, yes. William and Kate love to order curry while binge-watching HBO). And what about England’s kings and queens of the past? Is it all turkey legs and mead? The answer is, basically, yes.

Let’s take a look at what England’s royal family ate throughout history, starting with a look at the royal family’s preferences today.

The queen has to be pretty health conscious.

Queen Elizabeth II has always been in good health. This may be due in part to the fact that she follows a rather smart diet. She keeps away from low-nutrient, starchy foods like pasta, potatoes, and bread (especially for meals like lunch). And if the queen does eat pasta, it’s freshly made —and definitely not out of a box. She instead focuses on cleaner eats like grilled fish and freshly picked strawberries — you know, from her own estate in Balmoral, Scotland. The catch: She will only eat seasonal fruits, so if it wasn’t born of the earth on its own, she’s not interested.

So, what will you never find in the royal family’s meals? Garlic and shellfish — both are forbidden.

Why, you ask? Well, shellfish could get any of the royals sick without warning, and the queen thinks garlic is straight-up gross. And if she doesn’t like it, it definitely won’t be found in any royal dishes.

The queen enjoys a nice Sunday roast.

Just like any other family, the queen and her kin like to chow down at a nice Sunday roast, and – according to her former chef – the queen, prefers her meat well done. Oh, and she likes her mushrooms cooked with a dash of Marmite. Marmite, for those who aren’t familiar, is certainly an acquired taste.

The queen is not a foodie, nor a big lover of food.

In fact, one former chef explains, “Sadly, the Queen is not a foodie. She eats to live, unlike Prince Philip who loves to eat and would stand and talk food all day,” as noted in the Telegraph.

The queen loves a stiff drink.

Many pieces have been written about the queen’s love for a good drink. While perhaps it’s become a bit exaggerated, it’s likely that she enjoys a drink just about as often as the rest of us. After all, she is the leader of a country with a lot on her mind, so she deserves her share of gin and Dubonnet cocktails (with a lemon slice and some ice, just like the Queen Mother did).

Reportedly, she also enjoys a bit of wine and champagne throughout her day.

Even the royal corgis eat well.

One former chef recalls making an elaborate, delicious dish: “I simmered rabbit, cooked down some chicken, then finely chopped the meat, sieved the stock, and returned the meat… It was the corgis’ dog food.” In fact, the royal corgis are universally adored and have long been a part of the royal family makeup. Apparently, the queen has owned over 30 corgis since her coronation in 1952. The royal corgis even have their own Wikipedia page.

Prince Charles is a big fan of organic and foraged foods.

It’s known that the Prince of Wales and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, are fans of organic and sustainable eats — and good on them for promoting it! In fact, Prince Charles been called “one of the forerunners of the organic movement,” according to Today. Prince Charles owns an organic farm — one of the very first certified organic English farms — at Highgrove House, his private residence.

Prince Charles even grows fruits and veggies, and has his menus planned around foods that can be foraged — like wild mushrooms.

Yum! We wonder if he likes Marmite on his mushrooms, too?


Here’s Everything The Kings and Queens of England Ate Throughout History

When we think about the royal family, we often imagine a life of decadence and splendor. We watch their fashion choices closely, we try to guess the names of their future children, and we go absolutely manic when they get married. But what about their food choices? Do royal family meals consist of eating caviar and sipping on expensive wines every day, or do the royals make hunger-inspired McDonald’s runs like the rest of us?

We already know that Meghan Markle has a deep passion for food (she even co-wrote a cookbook) and that the royal kiddos have to follow a few specific and sort of quirky food rules — but what’s on the day-to-day menu? And what about royal banquets? Can they indulge in a pint (ice cream or beer — you decide) after a long day? Do they order in some nice take-out or enjoy fish n’ chips? (Actually, yes. William and Kate love to order curry while binge-watching HBO). And what about England’s kings and queens of the past? Is it all turkey legs and mead? The answer is, basically, yes.

Let’s take a look at what England’s royal family ate throughout history, starting with a look at the royal family’s preferences today.

The queen has to be pretty health conscious.

Queen Elizabeth II has always been in good health. This may be due in part to the fact that she follows a rather smart diet. She keeps away from low-nutrient, starchy foods like pasta, potatoes, and bread (especially for meals like lunch). And if the queen does eat pasta, it’s freshly made —and definitely not out of a box. She instead focuses on cleaner eats like grilled fish and freshly picked strawberries — you know, from her own estate in Balmoral, Scotland. The catch: She will only eat seasonal fruits, so if it wasn’t born of the earth on its own, she’s not interested.

So, what will you never find in the royal family’s meals? Garlic and shellfish — both are forbidden.

Why, you ask? Well, shellfish could get any of the royals sick without warning, and the queen thinks garlic is straight-up gross. And if she doesn’t like it, it definitely won’t be found in any royal dishes.

The queen enjoys a nice Sunday roast.

Just like any other family, the queen and her kin like to chow down at a nice Sunday roast, and – according to her former chef – the queen, prefers her meat well done. Oh, and she likes her mushrooms cooked with a dash of Marmite. Marmite, for those who aren’t familiar, is certainly an acquired taste.

The queen is not a foodie, nor a big lover of food.

In fact, one former chef explains, “Sadly, the Queen is not a foodie. She eats to live, unlike Prince Philip who loves to eat and would stand and talk food all day,” as noted in the Telegraph.

The queen loves a stiff drink.

Many pieces have been written about the queen’s love for a good drink. While perhaps it’s become a bit exaggerated, it’s likely that she enjoys a drink just about as often as the rest of us. After all, she is the leader of a country with a lot on her mind, so she deserves her share of gin and Dubonnet cocktails (with a lemon slice and some ice, just like the Queen Mother did).

Reportedly, she also enjoys a bit of wine and champagne throughout her day.

Even the royal corgis eat well.

One former chef recalls making an elaborate, delicious dish: “I simmered rabbit, cooked down some chicken, then finely chopped the meat, sieved the stock, and returned the meat… It was the corgis’ dog food.” In fact, the royal corgis are universally adored and have long been a part of the royal family makeup. Apparently, the queen has owned over 30 corgis since her coronation in 1952. The royal corgis even have their own Wikipedia page.

Prince Charles is a big fan of organic and foraged foods.

It’s known that the Prince of Wales and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, are fans of organic and sustainable eats — and good on them for promoting it! In fact, Prince Charles been called “one of the forerunners of the organic movement,” according to Today. Prince Charles owns an organic farm — one of the very first certified organic English farms — at Highgrove House, his private residence.

Prince Charles even grows fruits and veggies, and has his menus planned around foods that can be foraged — like wild mushrooms.

Yum! We wonder if he likes Marmite on his mushrooms, too?


Here’s Everything The Kings and Queens of England Ate Throughout History

When we think about the royal family, we often imagine a life of decadence and splendor. We watch their fashion choices closely, we try to guess the names of their future children, and we go absolutely manic when they get married. But what about their food choices? Do royal family meals consist of eating caviar and sipping on expensive wines every day, or do the royals make hunger-inspired McDonald’s runs like the rest of us?

We already know that Meghan Markle has a deep passion for food (she even co-wrote a cookbook) and that the royal kiddos have to follow a few specific and sort of quirky food rules — but what’s on the day-to-day menu? And what about royal banquets? Can they indulge in a pint (ice cream or beer — you decide) after a long day? Do they order in some nice take-out or enjoy fish n’ chips? (Actually, yes. William and Kate love to order curry while binge-watching HBO). And what about England’s kings and queens of the past? Is it all turkey legs and mead? The answer is, basically, yes.

Let’s take a look at what England’s royal family ate throughout history, starting with a look at the royal family’s preferences today.

The queen has to be pretty health conscious.

Queen Elizabeth II has always been in good health. This may be due in part to the fact that she follows a rather smart diet. She keeps away from low-nutrient, starchy foods like pasta, potatoes, and bread (especially for meals like lunch). And if the queen does eat pasta, it’s freshly made —and definitely not out of a box. She instead focuses on cleaner eats like grilled fish and freshly picked strawberries — you know, from her own estate in Balmoral, Scotland. The catch: She will only eat seasonal fruits, so if it wasn’t born of the earth on its own, she’s not interested.

So, what will you never find in the royal family’s meals? Garlic and shellfish — both are forbidden.

Why, you ask? Well, shellfish could get any of the royals sick without warning, and the queen thinks garlic is straight-up gross. And if she doesn’t like it, it definitely won’t be found in any royal dishes.

The queen enjoys a nice Sunday roast.

Just like any other family, the queen and her kin like to chow down at a nice Sunday roast, and – according to her former chef – the queen, prefers her meat well done. Oh, and she likes her mushrooms cooked with a dash of Marmite. Marmite, for those who aren’t familiar, is certainly an acquired taste.

The queen is not a foodie, nor a big lover of food.

In fact, one former chef explains, “Sadly, the Queen is not a foodie. She eats to live, unlike Prince Philip who loves to eat and would stand and talk food all day,” as noted in the Telegraph.

The queen loves a stiff drink.

Many pieces have been written about the queen’s love for a good drink. While perhaps it’s become a bit exaggerated, it’s likely that she enjoys a drink just about as often as the rest of us. After all, she is the leader of a country with a lot on her mind, so she deserves her share of gin and Dubonnet cocktails (with a lemon slice and some ice, just like the Queen Mother did).

Reportedly, she also enjoys a bit of wine and champagne throughout her day.

Even the royal corgis eat well.

One former chef recalls making an elaborate, delicious dish: “I simmered rabbit, cooked down some chicken, then finely chopped the meat, sieved the stock, and returned the meat… It was the corgis’ dog food.” In fact, the royal corgis are universally adored and have long been a part of the royal family makeup. Apparently, the queen has owned over 30 corgis since her coronation in 1952. The royal corgis even have their own Wikipedia page.

Prince Charles is a big fan of organic and foraged foods.

It’s known that the Prince of Wales and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, are fans of organic and sustainable eats — and good on them for promoting it! In fact, Prince Charles been called “one of the forerunners of the organic movement,” according to Today. Prince Charles owns an organic farm — one of the very first certified organic English farms — at Highgrove House, his private residence.

Prince Charles even grows fruits and veggies, and has his menus planned around foods that can be foraged — like wild mushrooms.

Yum! We wonder if he likes Marmite on his mushrooms, too?


Watch the video: Queen Elizabeth II has puppy playtime at dog charity