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Los Angeles’ Toca Madera Serves Up Tasty Mexican Cuisine

Los Angeles’ Toca Madera Serves Up Tasty Mexican Cuisine


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Vegan and gluten-free options round out the delicious organic dishes

It’s loud and crowded in the main bar of Los Angeles’ Toca Madera, so we headed to the back patio. A beautiful lit tree with twinkling lights centers the small space adorned with walls of skulls on one side and hanging plants in metal boxes on the opposite wall.

This restaurant, known for its sharing plates, caters to any dietary restriction in the crowd, including vegan and gluten-free. Appetizer highlights include the guacamole with pomegranate seeds, lime pepitas, and jalapeno served with house-made crispy plantain chips and the taquitos made with a choice of vegan picadillo, chicken or brisket and topped with jalapeno cabbage, queso fresco, avocado tomatillo salsa and pickled onions.

For our entrees, we chose the Chilean sea bass tacos with pasilla peppers, tomato, radish and an avocado vinaigrette; the American Waygu with cilantro, onions, habanero salt, and Diablo salsa; grilled tajin vegetables and street corn. All were a little on the spicy side and delicious.

Cocktails at Toca Madera are unique and worth the visit just to indulge in a few of the bar’s spectacular libations. The Dia de Los Muertos includes tocas patron reposado, banana du bresil, guava canela and lemon and is lit tableside. We also tried La Bonita with Avion Silver, strawberry basil lime, and an alderwood salt rim. Both were sweet (and beautiful – perfect for Instagram).

Desserts are tasty and include something for every craving. The chocolate tart is decadent with raspberry jam and pulled cocoa and the strawberry tres leches is savory with cake soaked in vanilla tres leches and layered with strawberries and whipped cream.

In a city packed with delicious tacos, we’ll return to Toca Madera for a crowd-pleasing meal. But there are delicious tacos in every state.


Toca Madera

When Tosh Berman, co-founder of the hospitality group EveryDay Life, returned to Los Angeles after living in Mexico for nearly six years, he discovered a stark gap in the Mexican food market. To fill it, and re-educate the public on the cuisine, he founded LA restaurant Toca Madera, which translates to “knock on wood” in Spanish. “True Mexican food is incredibly healthy, simple, and fresh,” says Berman. “In the U.S. there’s been a mass misconception of the essence of Mexican food. I wanted to reinvent that concept here.”

Berman contacted Davis Krumins of Costa Mesa, California-based Davis Ink to create a customized space for his brainchild. “Tosh approached us to essentially reinvent the definition of the Mexican food experience and wanted a complementary environment that reflected this high-end concept,” says Krumins.

The restaurant’s location was a key component in terms of traffic, accessibility, and placement in the community. “We wanted a space that we’d be able to turn into something interesting, high-end, and creative that was exciting not only for your average customer but also for the neighborhood,” says Berman.

Berman envisioned a modern and organic space featuring a color palette of brown and flame-inspired yellow and gold. Raw, earthy elements, such as custom reclaimed ceiling planks, decorative wood tiles, and walnut wood fixtures, were chosen to highlight the aesthetic. “We had a mix of contrasting materials, including aged metal, concrete tile, quartz stone, rope, lush upholstery, and tooled leather,” says Krumins. “The end result is an intimate living room experience.”

The team took advantage of the space’s existing bar footprint and opened it up as much as possible to create a 4,500-square-foot, 120-seat restaurant and lounge with a retractable roof, interior patio, and open-air dining environment. Though the original layout included two rooms, the center wall was ripped out to create one interactive space—one side a lounge experience and the other for dining.

A 100-square-foot linear crystal quartz bar serves as the centerpiece. “The energy was incredibly important, so we went with a solid stone crystal quartz bar to consciously and subconsciously evoke uplifting energy,” says Berman.

Similar materials were used throughout to unify the overall environment. Barstools with Roosevelt tufted seats stitched in light purple are mirrored in the purple upholstered tufted lounge booths. “We wanted to maintain continuity throughout the design,” says Berman.

Arabesque light fixtures outfitted with Edison bulbs emit an amber glow and create a moody atmosphere, while a grid of skull sculptures recessed into individually lit, raw steel and wooden boxes was inspired by the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos and installed along the back wall of the dining room.

The outdoor garden connects to the dining room via a live-edge wood sculptural tunnel and features retractable skylights and green plant elements, such as draping succulents hung in Mondrian configured planters, to enclose the space. “We took advantage of a pre-existing high ceiling space and transformed it into an intimate indoor patio experience,” says Krumins.

“We didn’t want to follow suit as another Mexican restaurant with traditional décor,” Berman adds. “You have to keep your head on a swivel and be able to move in another direction quickly to make sure you don’t sacrifice the design and stay true to the theme and integrity of the product.”


Toca Madera

When Tosh Berman, co-founder of the hospitality group EveryDay Life, returned to Los Angeles after living in Mexico for nearly six years, he discovered a stark gap in the Mexican food market. To fill it, and re-educate the public on the cuisine, he founded LA restaurant Toca Madera, which translates to “knock on wood” in Spanish. “True Mexican food is incredibly healthy, simple, and fresh,” says Berman. “In the U.S. there’s been a mass misconception of the essence of Mexican food. I wanted to reinvent that concept here.”

Berman contacted Davis Krumins of Costa Mesa, California-based Davis Ink to create a customized space for his brainchild. “Tosh approached us to essentially reinvent the definition of the Mexican food experience and wanted a complementary environment that reflected this high-end concept,” says Krumins.

The restaurant’s location was a key component in terms of traffic, accessibility, and placement in the community. “We wanted a space that we’d be able to turn into something interesting, high-end, and creative that was exciting not only for your average customer but also for the neighborhood,” says Berman.

Berman envisioned a modern and organic space featuring a color palette of brown and flame-inspired yellow and gold. Raw, earthy elements, such as custom reclaimed ceiling planks, decorative wood tiles, and walnut wood fixtures, were chosen to highlight the aesthetic. “We had a mix of contrasting materials, including aged metal, concrete tile, quartz stone, rope, lush upholstery, and tooled leather,” says Krumins. “The end result is an intimate living room experience.”

The team took advantage of the space’s existing bar footprint and opened it up as much as possible to create a 4,500-square-foot, 120-seat restaurant and lounge with a retractable roof, interior patio, and open-air dining environment. Though the original layout included two rooms, the center wall was ripped out to create one interactive space—one side a lounge experience and the other for dining.

A 100-square-foot linear crystal quartz bar serves as the centerpiece. “The energy was incredibly important, so we went with a solid stone crystal quartz bar to consciously and subconsciously evoke uplifting energy,” says Berman.

Similar materials were used throughout to unify the overall environment. Barstools with Roosevelt tufted seats stitched in light purple are mirrored in the purple upholstered tufted lounge booths. “We wanted to maintain continuity throughout the design,” says Berman.

Arabesque light fixtures outfitted with Edison bulbs emit an amber glow and create a moody atmosphere, while a grid of skull sculptures recessed into individually lit, raw steel and wooden boxes was inspired by the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos and installed along the back wall of the dining room.

The outdoor garden connects to the dining room via a live-edge wood sculptural tunnel and features retractable skylights and green plant elements, such as draping succulents hung in Mondrian configured planters, to enclose the space. “We took advantage of a pre-existing high ceiling space and transformed it into an intimate indoor patio experience,” says Krumins.

“We didn’t want to follow suit as another Mexican restaurant with traditional décor,” Berman adds. “You have to keep your head on a swivel and be able to move in another direction quickly to make sure you don’t sacrifice the design and stay true to the theme and integrity of the product.”


Toca Madera

When Tosh Berman, co-founder of the hospitality group EveryDay Life, returned to Los Angeles after living in Mexico for nearly six years, he discovered a stark gap in the Mexican food market. To fill it, and re-educate the public on the cuisine, he founded LA restaurant Toca Madera, which translates to “knock on wood” in Spanish. “True Mexican food is incredibly healthy, simple, and fresh,” says Berman. “In the U.S. there’s been a mass misconception of the essence of Mexican food. I wanted to reinvent that concept here.”

Berman contacted Davis Krumins of Costa Mesa, California-based Davis Ink to create a customized space for his brainchild. “Tosh approached us to essentially reinvent the definition of the Mexican food experience and wanted a complementary environment that reflected this high-end concept,” says Krumins.

The restaurant’s location was a key component in terms of traffic, accessibility, and placement in the community. “We wanted a space that we’d be able to turn into something interesting, high-end, and creative that was exciting not only for your average customer but also for the neighborhood,” says Berman.

Berman envisioned a modern and organic space featuring a color palette of brown and flame-inspired yellow and gold. Raw, earthy elements, such as custom reclaimed ceiling planks, decorative wood tiles, and walnut wood fixtures, were chosen to highlight the aesthetic. “We had a mix of contrasting materials, including aged metal, concrete tile, quartz stone, rope, lush upholstery, and tooled leather,” says Krumins. “The end result is an intimate living room experience.”

The team took advantage of the space’s existing bar footprint and opened it up as much as possible to create a 4,500-square-foot, 120-seat restaurant and lounge with a retractable roof, interior patio, and open-air dining environment. Though the original layout included two rooms, the center wall was ripped out to create one interactive space—one side a lounge experience and the other for dining.

A 100-square-foot linear crystal quartz bar serves as the centerpiece. “The energy was incredibly important, so we went with a solid stone crystal quartz bar to consciously and subconsciously evoke uplifting energy,” says Berman.

Similar materials were used throughout to unify the overall environment. Barstools with Roosevelt tufted seats stitched in light purple are mirrored in the purple upholstered tufted lounge booths. “We wanted to maintain continuity throughout the design,” says Berman.

Arabesque light fixtures outfitted with Edison bulbs emit an amber glow and create a moody atmosphere, while a grid of skull sculptures recessed into individually lit, raw steel and wooden boxes was inspired by the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos and installed along the back wall of the dining room.

The outdoor garden connects to the dining room via a live-edge wood sculptural tunnel and features retractable skylights and green plant elements, such as draping succulents hung in Mondrian configured planters, to enclose the space. “We took advantage of a pre-existing high ceiling space and transformed it into an intimate indoor patio experience,” says Krumins.

“We didn’t want to follow suit as another Mexican restaurant with traditional décor,” Berman adds. “You have to keep your head on a swivel and be able to move in another direction quickly to make sure you don’t sacrifice the design and stay true to the theme and integrity of the product.”


Toca Madera

When Tosh Berman, co-founder of the hospitality group EveryDay Life, returned to Los Angeles after living in Mexico for nearly six years, he discovered a stark gap in the Mexican food market. To fill it, and re-educate the public on the cuisine, he founded LA restaurant Toca Madera, which translates to “knock on wood” in Spanish. “True Mexican food is incredibly healthy, simple, and fresh,” says Berman. “In the U.S. there’s been a mass misconception of the essence of Mexican food. I wanted to reinvent that concept here.”

Berman contacted Davis Krumins of Costa Mesa, California-based Davis Ink to create a customized space for his brainchild. “Tosh approached us to essentially reinvent the definition of the Mexican food experience and wanted a complementary environment that reflected this high-end concept,” says Krumins.

The restaurant’s location was a key component in terms of traffic, accessibility, and placement in the community. “We wanted a space that we’d be able to turn into something interesting, high-end, and creative that was exciting not only for your average customer but also for the neighborhood,” says Berman.

Berman envisioned a modern and organic space featuring a color palette of brown and flame-inspired yellow and gold. Raw, earthy elements, such as custom reclaimed ceiling planks, decorative wood tiles, and walnut wood fixtures, were chosen to highlight the aesthetic. “We had a mix of contrasting materials, including aged metal, concrete tile, quartz stone, rope, lush upholstery, and tooled leather,” says Krumins. “The end result is an intimate living room experience.”

The team took advantage of the space’s existing bar footprint and opened it up as much as possible to create a 4,500-square-foot, 120-seat restaurant and lounge with a retractable roof, interior patio, and open-air dining environment. Though the original layout included two rooms, the center wall was ripped out to create one interactive space—one side a lounge experience and the other for dining.

A 100-square-foot linear crystal quartz bar serves as the centerpiece. “The energy was incredibly important, so we went with a solid stone crystal quartz bar to consciously and subconsciously evoke uplifting energy,” says Berman.

Similar materials were used throughout to unify the overall environment. Barstools with Roosevelt tufted seats stitched in light purple are mirrored in the purple upholstered tufted lounge booths. “We wanted to maintain continuity throughout the design,” says Berman.

Arabesque light fixtures outfitted with Edison bulbs emit an amber glow and create a moody atmosphere, while a grid of skull sculptures recessed into individually lit, raw steel and wooden boxes was inspired by the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos and installed along the back wall of the dining room.

The outdoor garden connects to the dining room via a live-edge wood sculptural tunnel and features retractable skylights and green plant elements, such as draping succulents hung in Mondrian configured planters, to enclose the space. “We took advantage of a pre-existing high ceiling space and transformed it into an intimate indoor patio experience,” says Krumins.

“We didn’t want to follow suit as another Mexican restaurant with traditional décor,” Berman adds. “You have to keep your head on a swivel and be able to move in another direction quickly to make sure you don’t sacrifice the design and stay true to the theme and integrity of the product.”


Toca Madera

When Tosh Berman, co-founder of the hospitality group EveryDay Life, returned to Los Angeles after living in Mexico for nearly six years, he discovered a stark gap in the Mexican food market. To fill it, and re-educate the public on the cuisine, he founded LA restaurant Toca Madera, which translates to “knock on wood” in Spanish. “True Mexican food is incredibly healthy, simple, and fresh,” says Berman. “In the U.S. there’s been a mass misconception of the essence of Mexican food. I wanted to reinvent that concept here.”

Berman contacted Davis Krumins of Costa Mesa, California-based Davis Ink to create a customized space for his brainchild. “Tosh approached us to essentially reinvent the definition of the Mexican food experience and wanted a complementary environment that reflected this high-end concept,” says Krumins.

The restaurant’s location was a key component in terms of traffic, accessibility, and placement in the community. “We wanted a space that we’d be able to turn into something interesting, high-end, and creative that was exciting not only for your average customer but also for the neighborhood,” says Berman.

Berman envisioned a modern and organic space featuring a color palette of brown and flame-inspired yellow and gold. Raw, earthy elements, such as custom reclaimed ceiling planks, decorative wood tiles, and walnut wood fixtures, were chosen to highlight the aesthetic. “We had a mix of contrasting materials, including aged metal, concrete tile, quartz stone, rope, lush upholstery, and tooled leather,” says Krumins. “The end result is an intimate living room experience.”

The team took advantage of the space’s existing bar footprint and opened it up as much as possible to create a 4,500-square-foot, 120-seat restaurant and lounge with a retractable roof, interior patio, and open-air dining environment. Though the original layout included two rooms, the center wall was ripped out to create one interactive space—one side a lounge experience and the other for dining.

A 100-square-foot linear crystal quartz bar serves as the centerpiece. “The energy was incredibly important, so we went with a solid stone crystal quartz bar to consciously and subconsciously evoke uplifting energy,” says Berman.

Similar materials were used throughout to unify the overall environment. Barstools with Roosevelt tufted seats stitched in light purple are mirrored in the purple upholstered tufted lounge booths. “We wanted to maintain continuity throughout the design,” says Berman.

Arabesque light fixtures outfitted with Edison bulbs emit an amber glow and create a moody atmosphere, while a grid of skull sculptures recessed into individually lit, raw steel and wooden boxes was inspired by the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos and installed along the back wall of the dining room.

The outdoor garden connects to the dining room via a live-edge wood sculptural tunnel and features retractable skylights and green plant elements, such as draping succulents hung in Mondrian configured planters, to enclose the space. “We took advantage of a pre-existing high ceiling space and transformed it into an intimate indoor patio experience,” says Krumins.

“We didn’t want to follow suit as another Mexican restaurant with traditional décor,” Berman adds. “You have to keep your head on a swivel and be able to move in another direction quickly to make sure you don’t sacrifice the design and stay true to the theme and integrity of the product.”


Toca Madera

When Tosh Berman, co-founder of the hospitality group EveryDay Life, returned to Los Angeles after living in Mexico for nearly six years, he discovered a stark gap in the Mexican food market. To fill it, and re-educate the public on the cuisine, he founded LA restaurant Toca Madera, which translates to “knock on wood” in Spanish. “True Mexican food is incredibly healthy, simple, and fresh,” says Berman. “In the U.S. there’s been a mass misconception of the essence of Mexican food. I wanted to reinvent that concept here.”

Berman contacted Davis Krumins of Costa Mesa, California-based Davis Ink to create a customized space for his brainchild. “Tosh approached us to essentially reinvent the definition of the Mexican food experience and wanted a complementary environment that reflected this high-end concept,” says Krumins.

The restaurant’s location was a key component in terms of traffic, accessibility, and placement in the community. “We wanted a space that we’d be able to turn into something interesting, high-end, and creative that was exciting not only for your average customer but also for the neighborhood,” says Berman.

Berman envisioned a modern and organic space featuring a color palette of brown and flame-inspired yellow and gold. Raw, earthy elements, such as custom reclaimed ceiling planks, decorative wood tiles, and walnut wood fixtures, were chosen to highlight the aesthetic. “We had a mix of contrasting materials, including aged metal, concrete tile, quartz stone, rope, lush upholstery, and tooled leather,” says Krumins. “The end result is an intimate living room experience.”

The team took advantage of the space’s existing bar footprint and opened it up as much as possible to create a 4,500-square-foot, 120-seat restaurant and lounge with a retractable roof, interior patio, and open-air dining environment. Though the original layout included two rooms, the center wall was ripped out to create one interactive space—one side a lounge experience and the other for dining.

A 100-square-foot linear crystal quartz bar serves as the centerpiece. “The energy was incredibly important, so we went with a solid stone crystal quartz bar to consciously and subconsciously evoke uplifting energy,” says Berman.

Similar materials were used throughout to unify the overall environment. Barstools with Roosevelt tufted seats stitched in light purple are mirrored in the purple upholstered tufted lounge booths. “We wanted to maintain continuity throughout the design,” says Berman.

Arabesque light fixtures outfitted with Edison bulbs emit an amber glow and create a moody atmosphere, while a grid of skull sculptures recessed into individually lit, raw steel and wooden boxes was inspired by the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos and installed along the back wall of the dining room.

The outdoor garden connects to the dining room via a live-edge wood sculptural tunnel and features retractable skylights and green plant elements, such as draping succulents hung in Mondrian configured planters, to enclose the space. “We took advantage of a pre-existing high ceiling space and transformed it into an intimate indoor patio experience,” says Krumins.

“We didn’t want to follow suit as another Mexican restaurant with traditional décor,” Berman adds. “You have to keep your head on a swivel and be able to move in another direction quickly to make sure you don’t sacrifice the design and stay true to the theme and integrity of the product.”


Toca Madera

When Tosh Berman, co-founder of the hospitality group EveryDay Life, returned to Los Angeles after living in Mexico for nearly six years, he discovered a stark gap in the Mexican food market. To fill it, and re-educate the public on the cuisine, he founded LA restaurant Toca Madera, which translates to “knock on wood” in Spanish. “True Mexican food is incredibly healthy, simple, and fresh,” says Berman. “In the U.S. there’s been a mass misconception of the essence of Mexican food. I wanted to reinvent that concept here.”

Berman contacted Davis Krumins of Costa Mesa, California-based Davis Ink to create a customized space for his brainchild. “Tosh approached us to essentially reinvent the definition of the Mexican food experience and wanted a complementary environment that reflected this high-end concept,” says Krumins.

The restaurant’s location was a key component in terms of traffic, accessibility, and placement in the community. “We wanted a space that we’d be able to turn into something interesting, high-end, and creative that was exciting not only for your average customer but also for the neighborhood,” says Berman.

Berman envisioned a modern and organic space featuring a color palette of brown and flame-inspired yellow and gold. Raw, earthy elements, such as custom reclaimed ceiling planks, decorative wood tiles, and walnut wood fixtures, were chosen to highlight the aesthetic. “We had a mix of contrasting materials, including aged metal, concrete tile, quartz stone, rope, lush upholstery, and tooled leather,” says Krumins. “The end result is an intimate living room experience.”

The team took advantage of the space’s existing bar footprint and opened it up as much as possible to create a 4,500-square-foot, 120-seat restaurant and lounge with a retractable roof, interior patio, and open-air dining environment. Though the original layout included two rooms, the center wall was ripped out to create one interactive space—one side a lounge experience and the other for dining.

A 100-square-foot linear crystal quartz bar serves as the centerpiece. “The energy was incredibly important, so we went with a solid stone crystal quartz bar to consciously and subconsciously evoke uplifting energy,” says Berman.

Similar materials were used throughout to unify the overall environment. Barstools with Roosevelt tufted seats stitched in light purple are mirrored in the purple upholstered tufted lounge booths. “We wanted to maintain continuity throughout the design,” says Berman.

Arabesque light fixtures outfitted with Edison bulbs emit an amber glow and create a moody atmosphere, while a grid of skull sculptures recessed into individually lit, raw steel and wooden boxes was inspired by the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos and installed along the back wall of the dining room.

The outdoor garden connects to the dining room via a live-edge wood sculptural tunnel and features retractable skylights and green plant elements, such as draping succulents hung in Mondrian configured planters, to enclose the space. “We took advantage of a pre-existing high ceiling space and transformed it into an intimate indoor patio experience,” says Krumins.

“We didn’t want to follow suit as another Mexican restaurant with traditional décor,” Berman adds. “You have to keep your head on a swivel and be able to move in another direction quickly to make sure you don’t sacrifice the design and stay true to the theme and integrity of the product.”


Toca Madera

When Tosh Berman, co-founder of the hospitality group EveryDay Life, returned to Los Angeles after living in Mexico for nearly six years, he discovered a stark gap in the Mexican food market. To fill it, and re-educate the public on the cuisine, he founded LA restaurant Toca Madera, which translates to “knock on wood” in Spanish. “True Mexican food is incredibly healthy, simple, and fresh,” says Berman. “In the U.S. there’s been a mass misconception of the essence of Mexican food. I wanted to reinvent that concept here.”

Berman contacted Davis Krumins of Costa Mesa, California-based Davis Ink to create a customized space for his brainchild. “Tosh approached us to essentially reinvent the definition of the Mexican food experience and wanted a complementary environment that reflected this high-end concept,” says Krumins.

The restaurant’s location was a key component in terms of traffic, accessibility, and placement in the community. “We wanted a space that we’d be able to turn into something interesting, high-end, and creative that was exciting not only for your average customer but also for the neighborhood,” says Berman.

Berman envisioned a modern and organic space featuring a color palette of brown and flame-inspired yellow and gold. Raw, earthy elements, such as custom reclaimed ceiling planks, decorative wood tiles, and walnut wood fixtures, were chosen to highlight the aesthetic. “We had a mix of contrasting materials, including aged metal, concrete tile, quartz stone, rope, lush upholstery, and tooled leather,” says Krumins. “The end result is an intimate living room experience.”

The team took advantage of the space’s existing bar footprint and opened it up as much as possible to create a 4,500-square-foot, 120-seat restaurant and lounge with a retractable roof, interior patio, and open-air dining environment. Though the original layout included two rooms, the center wall was ripped out to create one interactive space—one side a lounge experience and the other for dining.

A 100-square-foot linear crystal quartz bar serves as the centerpiece. “The energy was incredibly important, so we went with a solid stone crystal quartz bar to consciously and subconsciously evoke uplifting energy,” says Berman.

Similar materials were used throughout to unify the overall environment. Barstools with Roosevelt tufted seats stitched in light purple are mirrored in the purple upholstered tufted lounge booths. “We wanted to maintain continuity throughout the design,” says Berman.

Arabesque light fixtures outfitted with Edison bulbs emit an amber glow and create a moody atmosphere, while a grid of skull sculptures recessed into individually lit, raw steel and wooden boxes was inspired by the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos and installed along the back wall of the dining room.

The outdoor garden connects to the dining room via a live-edge wood sculptural tunnel and features retractable skylights and green plant elements, such as draping succulents hung in Mondrian configured planters, to enclose the space. “We took advantage of a pre-existing high ceiling space and transformed it into an intimate indoor patio experience,” says Krumins.

“We didn’t want to follow suit as another Mexican restaurant with traditional décor,” Berman adds. “You have to keep your head on a swivel and be able to move in another direction quickly to make sure you don’t sacrifice the design and stay true to the theme and integrity of the product.”


Toca Madera

When Tosh Berman, co-founder of the hospitality group EveryDay Life, returned to Los Angeles after living in Mexico for nearly six years, he discovered a stark gap in the Mexican food market. To fill it, and re-educate the public on the cuisine, he founded LA restaurant Toca Madera, which translates to “knock on wood” in Spanish. “True Mexican food is incredibly healthy, simple, and fresh,” says Berman. “In the U.S. there’s been a mass misconception of the essence of Mexican food. I wanted to reinvent that concept here.”

Berman contacted Davis Krumins of Costa Mesa, California-based Davis Ink to create a customized space for his brainchild. “Tosh approached us to essentially reinvent the definition of the Mexican food experience and wanted a complementary environment that reflected this high-end concept,” says Krumins.

The restaurant’s location was a key component in terms of traffic, accessibility, and placement in the community. “We wanted a space that we’d be able to turn into something interesting, high-end, and creative that was exciting not only for your average customer but also for the neighborhood,” says Berman.

Berman envisioned a modern and organic space featuring a color palette of brown and flame-inspired yellow and gold. Raw, earthy elements, such as custom reclaimed ceiling planks, decorative wood tiles, and walnut wood fixtures, were chosen to highlight the aesthetic. “We had a mix of contrasting materials, including aged metal, concrete tile, quartz stone, rope, lush upholstery, and tooled leather,” says Krumins. “The end result is an intimate living room experience.”

The team took advantage of the space’s existing bar footprint and opened it up as much as possible to create a 4,500-square-foot, 120-seat restaurant and lounge with a retractable roof, interior patio, and open-air dining environment. Though the original layout included two rooms, the center wall was ripped out to create one interactive space—one side a lounge experience and the other for dining.

A 100-square-foot linear crystal quartz bar serves as the centerpiece. “The energy was incredibly important, so we went with a solid stone crystal quartz bar to consciously and subconsciously evoke uplifting energy,” says Berman.

Similar materials were used throughout to unify the overall environment. Barstools with Roosevelt tufted seats stitched in light purple are mirrored in the purple upholstered tufted lounge booths. “We wanted to maintain continuity throughout the design,” says Berman.

Arabesque light fixtures outfitted with Edison bulbs emit an amber glow and create a moody atmosphere, while a grid of skull sculptures recessed into individually lit, raw steel and wooden boxes was inspired by the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos and installed along the back wall of the dining room.

The outdoor garden connects to the dining room via a live-edge wood sculptural tunnel and features retractable skylights and green plant elements, such as draping succulents hung in Mondrian configured planters, to enclose the space. “We took advantage of a pre-existing high ceiling space and transformed it into an intimate indoor patio experience,” says Krumins.

“We didn’t want to follow suit as another Mexican restaurant with traditional décor,” Berman adds. “You have to keep your head on a swivel and be able to move in another direction quickly to make sure you don’t sacrifice the design and stay true to the theme and integrity of the product.”


Toca Madera

When Tosh Berman, co-founder of the hospitality group EveryDay Life, returned to Los Angeles after living in Mexico for nearly six years, he discovered a stark gap in the Mexican food market. To fill it, and re-educate the public on the cuisine, he founded LA restaurant Toca Madera, which translates to “knock on wood” in Spanish. “True Mexican food is incredibly healthy, simple, and fresh,” says Berman. “In the U.S. there’s been a mass misconception of the essence of Mexican food. I wanted to reinvent that concept here.”

Berman contacted Davis Krumins of Costa Mesa, California-based Davis Ink to create a customized space for his brainchild. “Tosh approached us to essentially reinvent the definition of the Mexican food experience and wanted a complementary environment that reflected this high-end concept,” says Krumins.

The restaurant’s location was a key component in terms of traffic, accessibility, and placement in the community. “We wanted a space that we’d be able to turn into something interesting, high-end, and creative that was exciting not only for your average customer but also for the neighborhood,” says Berman.

Berman envisioned a modern and organic space featuring a color palette of brown and flame-inspired yellow and gold. Raw, earthy elements, such as custom reclaimed ceiling planks, decorative wood tiles, and walnut wood fixtures, were chosen to highlight the aesthetic. “We had a mix of contrasting materials, including aged metal, concrete tile, quartz stone, rope, lush upholstery, and tooled leather,” says Krumins. “The end result is an intimate living room experience.”

The team took advantage of the space’s existing bar footprint and opened it up as much as possible to create a 4,500-square-foot, 120-seat restaurant and lounge with a retractable roof, interior patio, and open-air dining environment. Though the original layout included two rooms, the center wall was ripped out to create one interactive space—one side a lounge experience and the other for dining.

A 100-square-foot linear crystal quartz bar serves as the centerpiece. “The energy was incredibly important, so we went with a solid stone crystal quartz bar to consciously and subconsciously evoke uplifting energy,” says Berman.

Similar materials were used throughout to unify the overall environment. Barstools with Roosevelt tufted seats stitched in light purple are mirrored in the purple upholstered tufted lounge booths. “We wanted to maintain continuity throughout the design,” says Berman.

Arabesque light fixtures outfitted with Edison bulbs emit an amber glow and create a moody atmosphere, while a grid of skull sculptures recessed into individually lit, raw steel and wooden boxes was inspired by the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos and installed along the back wall of the dining room.

The outdoor garden connects to the dining room via a live-edge wood sculptural tunnel and features retractable skylights and green plant elements, such as draping succulents hung in Mondrian configured planters, to enclose the space. “We took advantage of a pre-existing high ceiling space and transformed it into an intimate indoor patio experience,” says Krumins.

“We didn’t want to follow suit as another Mexican restaurant with traditional décor,” Berman adds. “You have to keep your head on a swivel and be able to move in another direction quickly to make sure you don’t sacrifice the design and stay true to the theme and integrity of the product.”


Watch the video: Toca Madera is the new hot spot in Scottsdale


Comments:

  1. Codey

    I am sorry, I can help nothing. But it is assured, that you will find the correct decision. Do not despair.

  2. Borre

    it is strange indeed

  3. Atrayu

    It happens. We can communicate on this theme. Here or at PM.

  4. Jennalyn

    smiled from the morning

  5. Jur

    awesome



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